Sustaining the Information Sharing Environment: The Key Role of Security and Privacy

Protecting the systems and processes Federal, State, and local entities use to exchange information may seem to be a trade-off in terms of effective sharing, in which more security and privacy would appear to restrict the free flow of information; yet in the long term, data protection is a key enabler for the ISE.

How can we retain privacy when doing business online?

The National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) at the Commerce Department recently held a workshop to discuss how protection of personal information can be made a key implementation element in the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC). The meeting discussed steps that Government and industry can take to develop and implement privacy-friendly policy and technology as a priority in the way we identify ourselves online.

Weekly Roundup January 15, 2016

The IBM Center's Weekly Roundup highlights articles and insights that we found interesting for the week ending January 15.

Daniel Chenok

New Report Explores the Use of Social Tools to Improve Interagency Collaboration

This week, the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) released a new report with support from the IBM Center for The Business of Government. The report, “New Tools for Collaboration: The Experience of the U.S. Intelligence Community,” is authored by Gregory Treverton, who conducted the study as an independent research effort prior to his returning to government service as Director of the National Intelligence Council. Treverton draws upon but reshapes the results of a RAND project done for the Center for the Study of Intelligence.

Idea to retire: A federal budget process that inhibits IT innovation

(This article first appeared on the Brookings Blog "TechTank.")

 

A review of the federal budget process

Helping Government Address Major Challenges and Opportunities

Enabling the public sector to deliver on mission priorities remains a major research theme of the IBM Center for The Business of Government.   Making this vital connection between outcomes that agencies strive for on behalf of the citizens they serve, and the good management needed to achieve those outcomes, is a critical link for effective government. 

Encouraging and Sustaining Innovation in Government for the New Administration (Part II)

Earlier this year, the IBM Center for The Business of Government and the Partnership for Public Service co-hosted a roundtable on innovation. The focus was how the next administration can use innovation to support the achievement of their priorities, how new agency leaders drive and sustain innovation, and how to enhance customer experience, and support empowerment of citizens and businesses.

Blog Co-Author: Alan Howze

Introducing the Center’s New Visiting Fellow for Global Management Issues, Prajapati Trivedi

Governments around the world face similar challenges, including how to raise program performance given constrained budgets, how to manage the development of policies and regulations for maximum benefit, and how to harness innovation to improve operations and serve citizens.  As governments have begun to explore sharing best practices for addressing these and similar challenges, the IBM Center for The Business of Government has increasingly worked with global leaders who are interested in research and actionable recommendations to raise public sector effectiveness.

Next White House Should Create an Enterprise Government

By using an enterprise-wide view of how the government can work, the next president may be more effective in getting large-scale initiatives underway and successfully completed, writes University of Massachusetts Distinguished Professor Jane Fountain, in a new report, being released today jointly by the IBM Center and the Partnership for Public Service.

The report offers three key recommendations to the next president’s transition team and the next White House:

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Executive Director
IBM Center for The Business of Government
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Dan Chenok is Executive Director of the IBM Center for The Business of Government. He oversees all of the Center's activities in connecting research to practice to benefit government, and has written and spoken extensively around government technology, cybersecurity, privacy, regulation, budget, acquisition, and Presidential transitions. Mr. Chenok previously led consulting services for Public Sector Technology Strategy, working with IBM government, healthcare, and education clients.

Mr. Chenok serves in numerous industry leadership positions. He is a CIO SAGE with the Partnership for Public Service, Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, Member of the GAO Science and Technology Assessment and Analytics Polaris Advisory Council, Chair of the Cybersecurity Subcommittee of the DHS Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee, Member of the Auburn University Center for Cyber and Homeland Security Board of Directors, Member of the American University IT Executive Council, and Co-Chair of the Senior Executives Association Community of Change for Governance Innovation; previously, he served as Chair of the Industry Advisory Council (IAC) for the government-led American Council for Technology (ACT), Chair of the Federal Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board, and two-time Cybersecurity commission member with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Mr. Chenok also generally advises public sector leaders on a wide range of management issues. Finally, Mr. Chenok serves as an Adjunct Associate Professor with the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas in Austin, teaching at the school's Washington, DC Center.

Before joining IBM, Mr. Chenok was a Senior Vice President for Civilian Operations with Pragmatics, and prior to that was a Vice President for Business Solutions and Offerings with SRA International.

As a career Government executive, Mr. Chenok served as Branch Chief for Information Policy and Technology with the Office of Management and Budget, where he led a staff with oversight of federal information and IT policy, including electronic government, computer security, privacy and IT budgeting. Prior to that, he served as Assistant Branch Chief and Desk Officer for Education, Labor, HHS, and related agencies in OMB's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. Mr. Chenok began his government service as an analyst with the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, and left government service at the end of 2003.

In 2008, Mr. Chenok served on President Barack Obama’s transition team as the Government lead for the Technology, Innovation, and Government Reform group, and as a member of the OMB Agency Review Team.

Mr. Chenok has won numerous honors and awards, including a 2010 Federal 100 winner for his work on the presidential transition, the 2016 Eagle Award for Industry Executive of the Year, and the 2002 Federal CIO Council Azimuth Award for Government Executive of the Year.

Mr. Chenok earned a BA from Columbia University and a Master of Public Policy degree from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.

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