Weekly Round-up: August 03, 2012

  • Not a Beatles Song: 16 years an hour. Government Computer News reports that Eric Hackathorn, the program manager of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Fragile Earth Studios wants us all to play more video games, and he thinks that if we spend more time gaming (noting that World of Warcraft has eaten up 16 million years of time), we could solve global problems.

Let a Thousand @s Bloom

At the most recent Tech@State, I moderated a panel on Organizational Collaboration.  Befitting a State Department event, the panel was composed of members from three continents.  Jutta von Dinklage spoke about her experiences implementing a wiki for Cancer Council Australia.  

Weekly Round-up: July 27, 2012

Boyle's Law for Data? The Pew Internet and American Life Project has released a report titled "The Future of Big Data" that begins with the line "We swim in a sea of data … and the sea level is rising rapidly."  What pressure does all that data exert on us?  Or on Twitter?

Review of "The Rise of Social Government" by the Fels Institute

report on the use of social media in local government.

Weekly Round-up: July 20, 2012

Ludwig Wittgentsein is Weeding Wilting Tuts.  Bill Gates thinks game-play will become more prevalent as a mode of teaching and learning.

Weekly Round-up: July 13, 2012

  • Psst! NIST on PIV.  FedScoop reports that "The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released the second draft version of its updated security standard for identity credentials in personal identity verification cards, also known as PIV cards.  The document. . . is now open for public comment"

Weekly Round-up: July 06, 2012

Social Media for Public Participation: Step 2 - Consult

Though informing is the first rung in the public participation ladder, it is the second step, consulting, that two—way communication and the promises it entails become paramount.

Weekly Round-up: June 29, 2012

Social Media for Public Participation: Step 1 - Inform

There are many roles for social media within government agencies.

Joshua Joseph of the Partnership for Public Service is spearheading research into one area: improving operations.  We had a lively, discursive conversation yesterday not only about how social media can be used at various points in an agency’s project life-cycle, but about how the Partnership can use social media in the creation of the report itself.

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Innovation Fellow, Emeritus
IBM Center for The Business of Government
600 14th Street, NW Second Floor
Washington, DC 20005
United States

Gadi Ben-Yehuda was our Innovation Fellow for the Center for The Business of Government. In the five years that Mr. Ben-Yehuda was with the Center, he was a speaker, panelist and moderator for events with State Department, Department of Labor, Department of Defense, General Services Administration, and other agencies. He also delivered presentations both nationally and internationally, at SxSW Interactive Festival in Austin, TX, the Global eGovernment Forum in Seoul, South Korea, and conferences in venues ranging from Washington, DC, to New York City, and Las Vegas, NV, to Burlington, VT. He was a prolific writer, with articles appearing on the Center’s blog, in Government Executive and Fast CoExist. He is active on Facebook, Twitter, and Vine. Mr. Ben-Yehuda has worked on the Web since 1994, when he received an email from Maya Angelou through his first Web site. He has an MFA in poetry from American University, has taught writing at Howard University, and has worked in Washington, DC, for nonprofits, lobbying organizations, Fleishman-Hillard Global Communications, and Al Gore's presidential campaign. Prior to his current position, Gadi was was a Web Strategist for the District of Columbia's Office of the chief Technology Officer (OCTO). Additionally, Gadi has taught creative, expository, and Web writing for more than 10 years to university students, private-sector professionals, and soldiers, including Marines at the Barracks at 8th and I in Washington, DC. Gadi is also a member of ACT-IAC.

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