Thomas H. Stanton

Thomas H. Stanton teaches at Johns Hopkins University. He is President of the Association for Federal Enterprise Risk Management (AFERM) and a former member of the federal Senior Executive Service. He is a Fellow and former board member of the National Academy of Public Administration and formerly chaired the Academy’s Standing Panel on Executive Organization and Management. With a career that spans the practical and the academic, Mr Stanton’s work has led to the creation of new federal offices and approaches to delivering public services more effectively.

Tools to Innovate: Data Analytics, Risk Management, and Shared Services

Today, governments have access to a variety of tools to successfully implement agency programs. For example, Data Analytics—especially of financial data—can be used to better inform decision making by ensuring agencies have the information they need at the point of time that it can be most effective. In addition, governments at all levels can more effectively address risks using new Risk Management approaches. And finally, Shared Services can not only save money, but also stimulate innovation, improve decisionmaking, and increase the quality of services expected by citizens.

Improving Government Decision Making through Enterprise Risk Management

While historically, the federal government has tended to focus risk management in the financial arena, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has recently launched a major reassessment of the government’s approach—encouraging the use of Enterprise Risk Management.

Strengthening Government's Ability to Deal with the Financial Crisis

As the administration and Congress take actions to address the immediate financial crisis, determining how to place the government's response on a stronger organizational footing is a key step to reducing the likelihood that the nation will experience a similar financial crisis in the future. In his report, Stanton points out the need to address past policies' inconsistencies, lack of transparency, and shortcomings in organizational capacity. In order to do so, he recommends a number of steps to:

Delivery of Benefits in an Emergency: Lessons from Hurricane Katrina

Tom Stanton's report focuses on the delivery of emergency financial benefits, such as pensions, Social Security, and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, as well as payments relating to the disaster such as emergency food stamps, unemployment insurance, and emergency cash assistance.

Federal Credit Programs: Managing Risk in the Information Age

This report highlights the fundamental tensions that federal credit programs face between doing good and doing well. On the one hand, the government provides support through loans and loan guarantees to borrowers who are not considered adequately served by commercial credit markets. On the other hand, the government cannot afford to lose large amounts of money by paying for an unacceptable number of defaults on federal loans.

Credit Scoring and Loan Scoring: Tools for Improved Management of Federal Credit Programs

The federal government currently administers loan and loan guarantee programs that amount to about $1 trillion of credit outstanding. Credit scoring and loan scoring offer the opportunity for federal credit agencies to devise scoring-based database management systems for a broad range of purposes. When applied to federal direct loans and guarantees, scoring may help some federal credit agencies to improve credit management as well as the implementation of public purposes related to their programs. Financial Management

Moving Toward a More Capable Government: A Guide for Organizational Design

This important report serves as an excellent companion piece to another published report, “Applying 21st-Century Government to the Challenge of Homeland Security,” by Elaine C. Kamarck of Harvard University. The Stanton report examines the organizational dilemma frequently faced by government: when to create or restructure a government agency or instrumentality. The Kamarck report examines three new forms of government that do not involve the creation of new government organizations or instrumentalities: reinvented government, government by network, and government by market.

Understanding Federal Asset Management: An Agenda for Reform

This project reviews federal management practices related to real property, personal property, and financial assets for which the federal government is responsible. Financial Management

 
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Center for Advanced Governmental Studies Johns Hopkins University
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Washington, DC 20036
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Thomas H. Stanton teaches at Johns Hopkins University. He is President of the Association for Federal Enterprise Risk Management (AFERM) and a former member of the federal Senior Executive Service. He is a Fellow and former board member of the National Academy of Public Administration and formerly chaired the Academy’s Standing Panel on Executive Organization and Management. With a career that spans the practical and the academic, Mr Stanton’s work has led to the creation of new federal offices and approaches to delivering public services more effectively.

Mr. Stanton has written several books including A State of Risk: Will Government Sponsored Enterprises Be the Next Financial Crisis? (HarperCollins, 1991), in which he invented the concept of contingent capital (see p 182) now being applied to major financial institutions internationally to help mitigate financial risk. He edited Meeting the Challenge of 9/11: Blueprints for Effective Government (M E Sharpe Publishers, 2006) and Making Government Manageable (co-edited with Benjamin Ginsberg, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004).

Mr. Stanton’s book, Why Some Firms Thrive While Others Fail: Governance and Management Lessons from the Crisis (Oxford University Press, 2012), analyzes differences in leadership, governance, and risk management between firms that successfully navigated the financial crisis and those that failed. Mr. Stanton co-edited, with Douglas Webster, Managing Risk and Performance: A Guide for Government Decision Makers, (John
Wiley & Sons, Inc , 2014).

Mr. Stanton holds degrees from the University of California at Davis, Yale University, and the Harvard Law School.

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