Drones Shine in Emergency Management

Guest Bloggers: Clement Decrop, Cognitive Solutions Consultant; Erin Hickok, Consultant, Public Service; and Alana Carmel, Senior Consultant, Advanced Analytics, IBM Global Business Services.

How Will Government Adapt?: Technology—Increasingly Everywhere

This is the second blog post in a series that sums up highlights of sessions held as part of the annual meeting in mid-November of the National Academy of Public Administration. This panel was moderated by Karen S. Evans, National Director, Partner, US Cyber Challenge and KE&T Partners LLC (and former head of e-government in the Office of Management and Budget). Panelists Mark A. Forman, Vice President, IT Services and Cloud Initiatives Dan Chenok, Executive Director, IBM Center for The Business of Government Highlights Background.

How Will Government Adapt?: Finding and Funding What Works

This is the third blog post in a series that sums up highlights of sessions held as part of the annual meeting in mid-November of the National Academy of Pubic Administration. The moderator for this session was Jon Baron, President, Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy. Panelists Grover J. “Russ”Whitehurst, Director, Brown Center on Education Policy, Brookings Institution; Former Director, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education Naomi Goldstein, Director, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S.

How Will Government Adapt?: Shifting Defense Priorities and Fiscal Realities

In particular, the Department must focus on mitigating high-risk issues and inefficiencies, including data security and accessibility, base realignment, and cost of employee benefits. The Department has already made progress in employing a change management approach, but further effort is needed. In light of these challenges, the Department can seize the current opportunity to maximize its resources and cultivate more strategic enterprise-level leadership.

How Will Government Adapt?: Reinvigorating the Civil Service

Surveys of college seniors show that only 6 percent would consider entering public service as a career, with only 2.3 percent willing to consider Federal service. What plans and strategies will federal departments and agencies employ to attract Millennials and Gen-Xers to public service over the next decade? What skill sets will employees need? Are departments and agencies prepared for this challenge? What actions will be needed to overcome these obstacles, seize opportunities and reinvigorate the public service?

How Will Government Adapt?: The State of State Finances

This is the sixth blog post in a series that sums up highlights of selected sessions held as part of the annual meeting in mid-November of the National Academy of Pubic Administration. Presenters John R. Bartle, Dean, College of Public Affairs and Community Service, University of Nebraska-Omaha Merl M. Hackbart, Provost Distinguished Service Professor & Interim Director Martin School of Public Policy & Administration, University of Kentucky Marilyn M.

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