Prajapati Trivedi

Prof. Prajapati Trivedi is a Senior Fellow (Governance) and a Director, Economic, Social and Sustainable Development Directorate, Commonwealth Secretariat, London. Previously, Professor Trivedi was an Adjunct Professor of Public Policy at the Indian School of Business (ISB), where he directed a project on ‘Regulating the Regulators’ and was the Faculty Chair for the Management Programme in Public Policy (MPPP). In addition, he was also a Visiting Economics Faculty at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

What Does Performance Management Look Like in India?

Sometimes it is refreshing to look at how other countries approach the challenge of measuring and managing performance in their governments. Last week, I had the opportunity to attend a World Bank seminar where the Secretary of Performance Management for the Government of India described how his country is doing it.

Government Reform: Insights for the Future of the Movement (Part 6)

  • Strong statutory and institutional structures and an investment in performance management systems seem to be more common in emerging countries.  For example, in Columbia this is embedded in their constitution and Kenya has created a department to lead the nation’s transformation efforts.  In more developed countries such as the United Kingdom and Ireland, these efforts are more administratively-based, oftentimes at the discretion of the prime minister.

Government Reform: Kenya and Malaysia (Part 4)

The World Bank seminars this past Spring continue to have me mulling about the progress of the performance movement internationally, and how surprised I was that several countries seem to be putting foundations for performance in place at two or three times the speed of more developed countries.  Four countries struck me as making notable progress.  I summarized two in a previous post (Colombia and South Africa).  Today I’ll focus on Kenya and Malaysia:

Government Reform: Colombia and South Africa (Part 3)

The World Bank seminars this past Spring on international progress in performance management continue to have me mulling about the progress of the performance movement internationally, and how surprised I was that several countries seem to be putting foundations for performance in place at two or three times the speed of more developed countries.  Four countries struck me as making notable progress.  I’ll summarize two today and two in my next post – along with notes on their commonalities:

Government Reform: The New Zealand Example (Part 2)

At the World Bank’s series of forums on performance management, I found John Whitehead’s insights particularly interesting.  Whitehead is a former secretary of the Treasury in New Zealand, which has been touted as the most advanced in performance-oriented government reform.  He looked back on what worked and what did not in their reform efforts over the past 25 years.  New Zealand’s effor

Government Reform: An International Snapshot of Progress on Performance Management (Part 1)

nations – with implications for the more developed countries.

The World Bank held a series of forums and invited presenters from Europe (Ireland, Britain), Africa (Kenya, South Africa), South America (Columbia, Brazil), and Southeast Asia/Pacific (Malaysia, New Zealand). The presentations and following discussions were both inspiring and cautionary, and I’ve been mulling over the past couple of months over what it all means for the future of the movement.

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