A Pivotal Period for Afghanistan: Interview with Larry Sampler, assistant to the USAID Administrator for Afghanistan & Pakistan

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In advance of the Afghan Presidential election run-off scheduled for June 14, Larry Sampler, assistant to the USAID Administrator for Afghanistan and Pakistan join me on The Business of Government to explore how USAID has sought to promote stability and order in Afghanistan and what is USAID's three-fold transition strategy. The following is an excerpt of our discussion on The Business of Government Hour.

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Reform of the Federal IT Budget - Increasing Strategy, Decreasing Complexity
The federal budget process is an exercise in time travel. At any given moment, agency budget and program managers may live in as many as three years at the...

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 A Pivotal Period for Afghanistan: Interview with Larry Sampler, assistant to the USAID Administrator for Afghanistan & Pakistan
Wednesday, June 11, 2014 - 11:55
In advance of the Afghan Presidential election run-off scheduled for June 14, Larry Sampler, assistant to the USAID...
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