Using Big Data Analytics to Effectively Oversee Financial Markets — The Three Essential Ingredients.

The (SEC) protects investors, maintains fair and orderly markets, and facilitates capital formation. It is organized into five divisions, one of which is the Enforcement Division, where Ms. Walsh’s Center is housed. Ms. Walsh says , “the Enforcement Division’s mission is to pursue violations of securities laws and to try to get meaningful remedies, with significant deterrent value. So identify, pursue, and prevent violations of the securities laws.” The SEC has several analytics programs that are structured in a “hub and spoke system.” Ms.

Three Key Ingredients to Build an Investigative Analytics Unit

The Recovery, Accountability, and Transparency Board (fondly known as RAT) was originally created by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to provide transparency of ARRA-related funds and detect and prevent fraud, waste, and mismanagement of those funds. Later the RAT Board's authority was expanded to include oversight of all federal funding. Mr. Beltz has worked for the public sector for over three decades, mostly in law enforcement as a “detective and reconstructionist.” Mr.

Making Data Real – Lessons From and For Federal Leaders

In this final installment, we provide highlights from these federal leaders on the most important ingredients for a successful analytics program. (You can watch the video of the panel discussion and listen to each of the seven podcast interviews too.) The executives profiled complex programs in several agencies that have a wide impact on citizens, who benefit greatly from leveraging data as a strategic asset in program operations. What follows are some highlights from those executives on salient take-aways for government and stakeholder groups who are implementing key data-driven programs.

ICYMI: Looking Back at 2014

My goal in blogging has been to provide context, insight, and inspiration on government management challenges for public sector managers, especially at the U.S. federal level. Following are blog posts from the past year organized around several themes, largely reflecting the trends reflected in the IBM Center’s research agenda. Hope you find this useful!

Big Data: It’s About Complexity, Not Size

Lieutenant Colonel Josh Helms is a data analyst in the Army serving as a Research Fellow in the Army's Training With Industry program, through which he works with IBM for one year before returning to the Army. His research fellowship is intended to help him learn how industry analyzes big data and communicates strategic insights to senior leaders to take this knowledge base back to the Army.

Challenges in Adopting a Big Data Strategy (Part 1 of 2)

Introduction This entry is the second in a series of blog posts discussing issues that the government faces with implementing big data. In the first blog post in this series, I described why data should be defined as "big" based on complexity of the data, not volume alone. In this entry, I address the first two of four major challenges for government in the implementation of big data: talent management and interoperability. In my next blog entry, I address trust and cyber infrastructure.

Five Examples of How Federal Agencies Use Big Data

This blog entry provides examples of how federal agencies and other levels of government are developing and applying big data strategies in the areas of fraud detection, financial market analysis, health related research, government oversight, education, criminology, environmental protection, and energy exploration. Introduction This entry is the fourth in a series of blog posts discussing issues that the government faces with implementing big data strategies. The first blog post in this series described why data should be defined as "big" based on complexity of the data, not volume alone.

Five Myths and Five Ways to Create an Analytics Culture

This entry is the fifth and final in a series of blog posts discussing issues that the government faces with implementing big data strategies. The first blog post in this series described why data should be defined as "big" based on complexity of the data, not volume alone. The second blog post and third blog post explained four challenges that a big data strategy presents for public sector organizations. The fourth blog post provided examples of areas and organizations from the public sector that are developing and applying big data strategies.

Dr. Shantanu Agrawal on Combating Fraud, Waste & Abuse in Healthcare

The U.S. was projected to spend $3.1 trillion dollars on healthcare generating billions of claims from healthcare service and product providers every year. Medicare alone accounts for something on the order of $635 billion in annual spending.

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