Using Big Data Analytics to Effectively Oversee Financial Markets — The Three Essential Ingredients.

The (SEC) protects investors, maintains fair and orderly markets, and facilitates capital formation. It is organized into five divisions, one of which is the Enforcement Division, where Ms. Walsh’s Center is housed. Ms. Walsh says , “the Enforcement Division’s mission is to pursue violations of securities laws and to try to get meaningful remedies, with significant deterrent value. So identify, pursue, and prevent violations of the securities laws.” The SEC has several analytics programs that are structured in a “hub and spoke system.” Ms.

Three Key Ingredients to Build an Investigative Analytics Unit

The Recovery, Accountability, and Transparency Board (fondly known as RAT) was originally created by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to provide transparency of ARRA-related funds and detect and prevent fraud, waste, and mismanagement of those funds. Later the RAT Board's authority was expanded to include oversight of all federal funding. Mr. Beltz has worked for the public sector for over three decades, mostly in law enforcement as a “detective and reconstructionist.” Mr.

Making Data Real – Lessons From and For Federal Leaders

In this final installment, we provide highlights from these federal leaders on the most important ingredients for a successful analytics program. (You can watch the video of the panel discussion and listen to each of the seven podcast interviews too.) The executives profiled complex programs in several agencies that have a wide impact on citizens, who benefit greatly from leveraging data as a strategic asset in program operations. What follows are some highlights from those executives on salient take-aways for government and stakeholder groups who are implementing key data-driven programs.

ICYMI: Looking Back at 2014

My goal in blogging has been to provide context, insight, and inspiration on government management challenges for public sector managers, especially at the U.S. federal level. Following are blog posts from the past year organized around several themes, largely reflecting the trends reflected in the IBM Center’s research agenda. Hope you find this useful!

Big Data: It’s About Complexity, Not Size

Big data should not be defined as “big” based on the size of the data alone. As defined by an important Commission on Big Data, big data is “a phenomenon that is a result of the rapid acceleration and exponential growth in the expanding volume of high velocity, complex and diverse types of data.” Organizations that do not necessarily have a large volume of data can benefit from a better understanding of the art of the possible with the new generation of analytic tools designed for big data.

Five Examples of How Federal Agencies Use Big Data

This blog entry provides examples of how federal agencies and other levels of government are developing and applying big data strategies in the areas of fraud detection, financial market analysis, health related research, government oversight, education, criminology, environmental protection, and energy exploration.

Introduction

Dr. Shantanu Agrawal on Combating Fraud, Waste & Abuse in Healthcare

The U.S. was projected to spend $3.1 trillion dollars on healthcare generating billions of claims from healthcare service and product providers every year. Medicare alone accounts for something on the order of $635 billion in annual spending.

Weekly Roundup May 15, 2015

OMB Deputy Director Beth Cobert discusses importance of #SES #leadership to government performance @ombpress.

Can We Focus on What Works?

Last week, I attended a Senate hearing on wasteful spending in the federal government. Some of the witnesses pointed to examples such as the legislative requirement that the Defense Department ship coal to Germany to heat American bases there. Others pointed to failures of large-scale computer projects and the dozens of programs on the GAO’s High Risk List. While many of the examples given were seen as shocking, there was little conversation about focusing on what works and expanding those programs. Interestingly, there is a movement underway across the U.S. to do just that.

Innovation Entrepreneurs Unite!

Using “lightening round” presentations, nearly a dozen presenters shared their stories. Andy Feldman from the Department of Education, who coordinated the event, noted that the goal wasn’t innovation for innovation’s sake, but rather to use innovation as a tool to tackle mission-related performance challenges: “We’re here to focus innovation on our agencies’ biggest challenges and opportunities.” Delegated Deputy Secretary of Education John King also welcomed attendees, urging them to put ideas into action.

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