strategy

 

strategy

Managing "Big Science:" A Case Study of the Human Genome Project

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
This report reviews the history of management of the National Human Genome Project at the National Institutes of Health, the federal government's largest science project since the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Apollo Project. The Human Genome Project involved scientists around the world "working around the clock" for over 15 years. The study focuses on Project Director Francis Collins, who has overseen the successful completion of several of the Genome Project's goals.

Government Reorganization: Strategies and Tools to Get It Done

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
This report provides various approaches to how government can undertake reorganization initiatives. It identifies four historical driving forces for reorganizations: to make government work better, to save money, to enhance power, and to address pressing problems. The report then examines four principal reorganization strategies that policy makers have used in the past: commissions, presidential reorganization authority, executive-branch reorganization staff, and congressional initiatives.

A Vision of the Government as a World-Class Buyer: Major Procurement Issues for the Coming Decade

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
This report includes an analysis of the key issues facing government procurement and the steps that must be taken to address those issues. The study describes a "vision" of the government's procurement process at the end of the decade and how to efficiently and effectively transition to this "vision." Contracting

Measuring the Performance in E-Government

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
This project proposes to find and track current government use of performance measures for monitoring e-government performance at the local, state and federal levels. This information can then be used by other jurisdictions to aid in their own performance measurement efforts-- to the benefit of all e-government activities. minnesota, mississippi, texas, virginia Technology and E-Government

The Challenge of Managing Across Boundaries: The Case of the Office of the Secretary in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
Since its creation in 1953 as an amalgam of several existing agencies, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (originally the Department of Health, Education and Welfare) has struggled to find the appropriate balance between centralized functions in the Office of the Secretary and autonomy to the various agencies and bureaus contained within its boundaries. Over the years, the pendulum has swung back and forth between emphasis on centralization and decentralization.

Digitally Integrating the Government Supply Chain: E-Procurment, E-Finance, and E-Logistics

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
This project represents a year long partnership between the IBM Endowment for the Business of Government and the University of Maryland School of Public Affairs' Center for Public Policy and Private Enterprise. The Center, under the direction of Dr. Jacques Gansler, hosted a series of three Leader Forums at the Aspen Institute's Wye River Conference Centers, held over a 12-month period. The forums brought together government and business leaders to examine how the federal government could "digitally integrate" its supply chain.

Trans-Atlantic Experiences in Health Reform: The United Kingdom's National Health Service and the United States Veterans Health Administration

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
This report includes a comparative study of the NHS and VHA reforms, and examines how two large public systems responded to the challenge of health reform. The study evaluates the reform impacts on health service delivery in each setting, explores how implementation was managed, and describes the effects on organization, workforce, and culture.Organizational Transformation

Commerce Comes to Government on the Desktop: E-Commerce Applications in the Public Sector

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
This report examines electronic commerce and other World Wide Web technologies currently available in the private and public sector. The study provides insights into how government can enhance its delivery of services online. The report aims to spark creativity and innovation in the use of technology in the public sector, and to leverage private sector uses of technology in the public sector. Technology and E-Government

Determining a Level Playing Field for Public-Private Competition

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
This report provides an analysis of the theoretical and practical issues involved in creating a level playing field for public-private competitions. The notion of a level playing field is that governments should create a set of policies and procedures governing public-private competitions such that neither government nor the private sector has a competitive advantage. The study assesses the challenges involved in attempting to create the level playing field. Contracting

Collaboration: Using Networks and Partnerships

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
As government faces more complex problems, and citizens expect more, the way government delivers services and results is changing rapidly. The traditional model of government agencies administering hundreds of programs by themselves is giving way to one-stop services and cross-agency results. This translation implies collaboration--within agencies; among agencies; among levels of governments; and among the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. The first part of this book describes what networks and partnerships are.