State and local

 

State and local

Managing Workfare: The Case of the Work Experience Program in the New York City Parks Department

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
This report examines the implementation of welfare reform in the United States, specifically in New York City. In the future, many local governments will be faced with the challenge and opportunities presented by the presence of former welfare recipients in the workforce. New York City has the largest local workfare population in the United States, and the New York City Parks Department manages one of the city's largest Work Experience Program (WEP) workforces. Innovation

Understanding Innovation: What Inspires It? What Makes It Successful?

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
Public sector innovation may be considered an oxymoron, but for 15 years the Ford Foundation and John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University have been identifying innovative public sector programs at the state, local, federal and tribal government levels through the Innovations in American Government Awards program, funded by Ford and administered by the Kennedy School.

Managing for Results 2002

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
This book summarizes five innovative, yet practical, approaches that public sector organizations use to better manage for results, increase organizational performance, and improve accountability to stakeholders. Patrick J. Murphy and John Carnevale tell the story--and the lessons--of how the Office of National Drug Control Policy crafted a government-wide strategic plan to combat drug abuse in the United States. Paul E.

Supercharging the Employment Agency: An Investigation of the Use of Information and Communication Technology to Improve the Service of State Employment Agencies

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
This report determines critical challenges facing state employment agencies with regard to their use of communications and information technologies and identifies current best practices that address these challenges. When information and communications technologies are effectively transferred into employment commission functions, the possibility exists to radically improve commission service while at the same time reducing the costs of agency operations.