GAO

 

GAO

Federal Government Reform Resources: GAO’s List

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012 - 12:37
Tuesday, December 11, 2012 - 11:28
Three years ago, GAO was required by law to annually publish a report detailing duplicative, overlapping, and fragmented federal programs.  It will be issuing its third report in early 2013. But it is preparing its list now for potential government reorganizers.

Bridging the Gap

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012 - 11:31
Tuesday, November 6, 2012 - 10:11
I’ve been asked to participate as a “practitioner” on a discussion panel at the upcoming conference of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)  It is a high-powered conference of top academics from around the U.S.

Key Features of Cross-Agency Collaborative Mechanisms

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012 - 14:20
Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 14:15
GAO’s latest study on collaborative governance is based on an analysis of more than 300 past GAO reports covering issues such as homeland security, agriculture, and health, as well as a series of interviews with experts on the topic.

Using Consultations to Make Informed Decisions

Thursday, July 5th, 2012 - 11:35
Thursday, July 5, 2012 - 11:31
The Government Accountability Office (GAO) works for Congress and is a big proponent of performance-informed decision making.  So they’ve written a practical report on how Congress can effectively use performance information produced by federal agencies to make better decisions.  And they’ve illustrated the report with three examples of where congressional committees, over a period of years, used performance information to guide key decisions in diverse areas such as immigration, HIV/AIDs, and improper payments.

How Can Bid Protests be Reduced in Government Contracting?

Monday, June 11th, 2012 - 14:08
By: 
Monday, June 11, 2012 - 13:57
Government administrative processes often receive criticism for focusing on inputs and not outcomes.  A specific example of this criticism has been registered by members of the acquisition com­munity regarding source selection processes used for contracting that could be improved to reduce bid protests, the appellate pro­cess for contracting.  Protests do not occur frequently, but when they do occur the costs are significant—and when sustained, they can impact the process for many subsequent contracts.  Bid pro­tests and source selection processes cont

Improving Government Contracting: Lessons from Bid Protests of Department of Defense Source Selections

Friday, June 8th, 2012 - 14:32
Author(s): 
Government administrative processes often receive criticism for focusing on inputs and not outcomes. A specific example of this criticism has been registered by members of the acquisition community regarding source selection processes used for contracting that could be improved to reduce bid protests, the appellate process for contracting. Protests do not occur frequently, but when they do occur the costs are significant—and when sustained, they can impact the process for many subsequent contracts.

Reorganizing Management Functions: A Manager's Checklist

Thursday, May 31st, 2012 - 17:11
Thursday, May 31, 2012 - 17:05
Sometimes GAO does terrific work but couches it in ways that its value may not be immediately obvious to busy readers.  Here’s a very practical report that looks at eight recent consolidation efforts undertaken by federal agencies and identifies five sets of questions that managers should be able to answer if they find themselves in charge of an initiative to consolidate infrastructure or management functions.  Since these kinds of reorganization efforts will likely be more common in coming years as agencies look for strategie

Use Technology to Enhance Productivity

Friday, May 25th, 2012 - 17:49
Posted by: 
This is because government now has thousands of mission systems using legacy architecture, each built for a single purpose to support the needs of a single program or agency. Common standards, common definitions of like data, or enterprise approaches are rarely used in the federal government. Government does not often leverage IT to make things simpler, generate economies of scale, or increase collaboration. Over the last 20 years, mission systems have become more customized and focused on single programs or needs, making government information systems at once more siloed and complex.

Should Government Reorganize Itself? (Part VI)

Thursday, April 12th, 2012 - 11:19
Thursday, April 12, 2012 - 11:12
Typically, the cultural, administrative, and legal barriers to working together collaboratively inside the federal government are too high and they discourage efforts to collaborate (more on this in a future post).  The Obama Administration has taken some steps, such as the president’s directive last year that encourages administrative flexibility by federal agencies when working with state and local governments.

Should Government Reorganize Itself? (Part V)

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012 - 10:24
Wednesday, April 11, 2012 - 10:21
Structural reorganization initiatives – like the creation of the Department of Homeland Security -- are slow, take an enormous amount of effort, and require years to become effective.  Ultimately, the new structure becomes rigid and needs to be revisited.  Many observers advocate creating more adaptable approaches that allow a mix and match of capabilities.  What are some potential options for doing this? Executive Branch Options
0 comments
The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.

Your comment will appear after administrative review.

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

1199 recommendations