Executives

 

Executives

A Manager's Guide to Resolving Conflicts in Collaborative Networks

Tuesday, January 1st, 2008 - 20:00
The O'Leary and Bingham report expands on previous Center reports by adding an important practical tool for managers in networks: how to manage and negotiate the conflicts that may occur among a network's members. The approach they describe-interest-based negotiation-has worked in other settings, such as bargaining with unions. Such negotiation techniques are becoming crucial in sustaining the effectiveness of networks, where successful performance is defined by how well people collaborate and not by hierarchical commands.

Executive Response to Changing Fortune: Sean O'Keefe as NASA Administrator

Friday, October 28th, 2005 - 20:00
Author(s): 
This report describes the tenure of Sean O’Keefe as administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The report describes how O’Keefe faced three difficult challenges during his three years at NASA. His first challenge was to solve the space station’s financial mess. His second challenge was to manage the aftermath of the Columbia shuttle disaster. His third challenge was to steward the President’s 2004 vision for the further exploration of space.

Getting to Know You: Rules of Engagement for Political Appointees and Career Executives

Friday, December 31st, 2004 - 20:00
Ferrara and Ross dispel common myths held by political appointees about careerists and by careerists about political appointees. One such myth about careerists suggests that they are loyal to the previous administration. A myth about political appointees implies that they care only about ideology and not about organizational stewardship. The report sets forth constructive "rules of engagement" that political and career executives can use to form partnerships in achieving the administration’s program and policy objectives.

Becoming an Effective Political Executive: 7 Lessons from Experienced Appointees.

Friday, December 31st, 2004 - 20:00
Author(s): 
This report was prepared to assist new political appointees as they enter the political world of Washington, D.C. The study is based on two surveys of previous political appointees, as well as personal interviews with nearly 50 former political executives from both Democratic and Republican administrations. Their experiences have been distilled into seven key lessons: turn to your careerists, partner with your political colleagues, remember the White house, collaborate with Congress, think media, pace yourself, and enjoy the job.

Performance Management for Political Executives: A 'Start Where You Are, Use What You Have' Guide

Thursday, September 30th, 2004 - 20:00
Author(s): 
Wye describes how political executives can overcome common problems in the design, alignment, use, and communication of performance measures and information. The report links performance-based management to the higher calling of public service and provides a meaningful rationale as to why political executives should care about performance-based management. In the past, political appointees have traditionally focused primarily on the political agenda, without much attention given to management responsibilities.

Audited Financial Statements: Getting and Sustaining "Clean" Opinions

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
This report examines how organizational factors and management strategies have affected the ability of federal agencies to generate reliable information for financial statements and achieve unqualified audit opinions. By indentifying successful management strategies, this study offers recommendations about how agencies can better approach the recurring requirements to produce annual audited financial statements. Financial Management

Results of the Government Leadership Survey

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
Will the federal government be able to recruit and retain employees with the qualities needed for leaders in the future? To help answer that question, the IBM Center for The Business of Government surveyed career and noncareer members of the federal Senior Executive Service (SES). Survey results showed that federal executives have a new vision of leadership and think that changes in current leadership systems will help make the vision a reality. Human Capital ManagementLeadership

Managing Decentralized Departments: The Case of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
Since its creation in 1953 as an amalgam of several existing agencies, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (originally the Department of Health, education and Welfare) has struggled to find the appropriate balance between centralized functions in the Office of the Secretary and autonomy to the various agencies and bureaus contained within its boundaries. Over the years, the pendulum has swung back and forth between emphasis on centralization and decentralization.

Profiles in Excellence: Conversations with the Best of America's Career Executive Service

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
This report consists of a series of in-depth interviews with senior executives in government who have been identified as outstanding leaders. The study attempts to determine the characteristics that have most centrally contributed to the success of these senior executives. Leadership

Reflections on Mobility: Case Studies of Six Federal Executives

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 14:00
Author(s): 
This report offers case studies of five current federal career executives, each of whom accomplished major changes in several different federal agencies. The study identifies common factors in their experiences that led to their inter-agency mobility. These factors provide useful guidelines for creating incentives to encourage more widespread mobility in the future and allow federal executives to consciously plan for greater career mobility to ensure a more flexible and responsive government. Human Capital Management Leadership