Citizen participation

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Citizen participation

Social Media Trends in Gov for 2010

Wednesday, November 25th, 2009 - 17:51
I am not a tech-toy pioneer.  It was two years before I logged onto my company’s instant message system because I thought it would create ADD symptoms (it didn’t).  I just got a Blackberry a few weeks ago (yes, Blackberry, not iPhone) because I lost my PalmPilot calendar and they don’t make them anymore.  And I resisted a Twitter account because I thought it was silly, frivolous, and seemingly narcissistic.

Reinventing Saudi Arabia

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009 - 16:18
David Osborne, of Reinventing Government fame, keynoted today's session at the Saudi conference on public administration.  He said there are two sets of reforms running in parallel across the globe today.  The first focuses on getting the basics right: a professional public service, rule of law, prosecuting corruption, a transparent budget and contracting system, etc.  A key to this appro

On-Line Town Halls

Monday, October 26th, 2009 - 18:26
This past summer the spectacle of unruly congressional town hall meetings on health care reform played across the media.

Engaging Citizens in the Job of Performance Reporting

Tuesday, October 6th, 2009 - 16:26
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By making data more widely available—even if only within the federal government—it will empower a wide range of users to more routinely make fact-based decisions. This has the effect of pushing analysis and decision making down to the front line instead of to staff offices. This could be the beginning of a new performance agenda, which author W. David Stephenson calls “democratizing data.” Support for making such data available more broadly to the public is being pushed by advocacy groups such as the Sunlight Foundation.

Citizen Engagement: GSA Update

Friday, October 2nd, 2009 - 17:33
While there’s been little open discussion in recent days about the progress of President Obama’s Open Government Directive, the General Services Administration’s quarterly “Intergovernmental Solutions” newsletter has dedicated its latest issue to describing dozens of examples of how citizen engagement is increasing in government – federal, state, local, as well as other countries.  It is worth reading!

Engaging Citizens in Oversight

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009 - 16:41
There’s a great lead article by Elise Castelli in this week’s Federal Times, “Feds to Empower ‘Citizen IGs’ to Watch Stimulus Spending.”  This is a real experiment in the ultimate use of crowdsourcing – providing the data on spending via recovery.gov and letting on-the-ground citizens to help interpret and make sense of it in their communities.

Using Crowdsourcing in Government

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009 - 16:24
For years, democracy advocates have promoted the notion of engaging citizens in their government.  There are different ways of doing this (public hearings, debates, dialogue panels, etc), and at different points in the policy cycle (proposing, debating, implementing, reviewing, etc.).

Citizen Participation: An Update

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009 - 15:16
Increasing participation in government by citizens is a key element of President Obama’s Transparency and Open Government initiative.  He signed a directive his first full day in office to create guidance for agencies on how they should go about implementing the principles in the directive, but delays in appointing officials have led to a delay in the development and release of the guidance.

What Do You Do With 110,000 Data Sets?

Friday, September 4th, 2009 - 17:23
The Obama Administration’s data.gov website now has 110,000 government data sets that you can access and download.  So what do you do with this stuff?  Well, Sunlight Labs, an open government advocacy group, is sponsoring a contest encouraging citizens (well, okay, data geeks) to come up with applications that use the data in interesting ways.

Blogs as Public Policy Forums

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2009 - 18:27
A new study out by Brookings “Blogs as Public Forums for Agency Policymaking” looks at blogs created by top officials in five federal agencies and compared them to similar, but non-official blogs on the same topics to see how each are used to link citizens and government officials.  Authors Julianne Mahler and Pricilla Regan found that these agency blogs “elicit more controversy than expected” and that they “have more posts and comments” than related, but non-agency sponsored blo
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