Accountability

 

Accountability

Managing for Results 2005

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 13:00
The "managing for results" movement that began in the early 1990s has now reached adolescence and is creating new challenges for government managers. After spending years creating planning and performance-measuring systems, managers and policy makers now need to focus on how to use performance information to make data-driven decisions. Managing Results for 2005 describes--through a series of case studies--the progress being made in federal, state, and local governments in managing for results. Managing for Performance and Results  

Managing for Results 2002

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 13:00
This book summarizes five innovative, yet practical, approaches that public sector organizations use to better manage for results, increase organizational performance, and improve accountability to stakeholders. Patrick J. Murphy and John Carnevale tell the story--and the lessons--of how the Office of National Drug Control Policy crafted a government-wide strategic plan to combat drug abuse in the United States. Paul E.

Using Performance Data for Accountability: The New York City Police Department's CompStat Model of Police Management

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 13:00
Author(s): 
This report examines the New York City Police Department’s innovative model of police management known as COMPSTAT. The study identifies the management practices that are associated with COMPSTAT and documents the process of dissemination and adoption of COMPSTAT by other police departments across the nation. Managing for Performance and Results

Transforming Organizations

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 13:00
This book provides in-depth case studies of outstanding government executives who dramatically changed both the performance and management of their organizations. The book includes case studies of Dan Goldin of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Ken Kizer of the Veterans Health Administration, James Lee Witt of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and four high-ranking government officials who changed procurement in the Department of Defense. In addition, the book includes interviews with NASA Administrator Goldin and FEMA's Director Witt.

Audited Financial Statements: Getting and Sustaining "Clean" Opinions

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 13:00
Author(s): 
This report examines how organizational factors and management strategies have affected the ability of federal agencies to generate reliable information for financial statements and achieve unqualified audit opinions. By indentifying successful management strategies, this study offers recommendations about how agencies can better approach the recurring requirements to produce annual audited financial statements. Financial Management

Moving Toward Market-Based Government: The Changing Role of Government as the Provider

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 13:00
Author(s): 
One of President Bush’s five management initiatives is competitive sourcing. The administration has established a goal that the federal government should competitively source 50% of all non-inherently governmental positions by 2005. To achieve this goal will require a major shift in the way government does its business. This project defines competitive sourcing and outsourcing, shows which situations are appropriate to use one or the other, and lists steps for successful implementation.

The Challenge of Developing Cross-Agency Measures: A Case Study of the Office of National Drug Control Policy

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 13:00
This report presents a case-study of the Office of National Drug Control Policy’s development and implementation of a performance measures system. The study examines how the agency moved to a system of accountability linked to program resources and offers insight into the challenge of holding agencies accountable for programs that cut across organizational lines. Managing for Performance and Results

Modernizing Human Resources at the Internal Revenue Service

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 13:00
This project describes the many human resource innovations that have taken place in the Internal Revenue Service over the past five years. Organizational human resource innovations include splitting the personnel function in IRS into three parts: the Office of Strategic Human Resource Management, agency-wide Shared Services, and "embedded" human resource units in each of the major operating divisions. This project also describes the use of broadbanding at the IRS.

The Procurement Partnership Model: Moving to a Team-Based Approach

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 13:00
Author(s): 
The emerging partnership model of procurement is characterized by team-based approaches, new contracting vehicles, an outcome orientation, and increased emphasis on open communication and due diligence.This report describes the strategies that have worked for both achieving results and ensuring accountability. The report also outlines what still needs to be done to see these successful approaches utilized more widely in the procurement process. Contracting

Transborder Service Systems: Pathways for Innovation or Threats to Accountability?

Monday, January 1st, 2001 - 13:00
Author(s): 
This report describes the emergence of contracts that cross local borders. One example is Edison Schools, which is now the country’s leading private manager of public schools, operating 136 schools in 22 states. Another example is Maximus Incorporate that operates social service programs in all 50 states, 49 of the fifty largest cities, and 27 of the thirty largest counties. A third example includes the construction of the new Cross Israel Highway that is led by the Canadian Highways Infrastructure Corporation.