The Incident Command Model - Best Practices

 

The Incident Command Model - Best Practices

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014 - 12:16

 

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This newsletter highlights three reports that focus on the use of the Incident Command Model in emergencies.  Our newest report, "Adapting the Incident Command Model for Knowledge-Based Crises:  The Case of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention," provides a case study of how the CDC developed and applied a revised incident management approach to meet the needs of an emergency situation.  In the report, "From Forest Fires to Hurricane Katrina: Case Studies of Incident Command Systems," four cases studies are presented with recommendations for when the Incident Command System can be successful.  In the last report, "Leveraging Collaborative Networks in Infrequent Emergency Situations," the author summarizes the insights from a contagious disease outbreak effecting poultry and how the use of collaborative networks and the Incident Command System were used to contain the issue.

 

Adapting the Incident Command Model for Knowledge-Based Crises: The Case of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Adapting the Incident Command Model for Knowledge-Based Crises: The Case of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Authors: Christopher Ansell and Ann Keller

This report is a case study of one science-based agency—the CDC in the Department of Health and Human Services—which sought to use the standard Incident Commandy System (ICS) model but ultimately developed a significantly revised approach to incident management. The report finds that the transformation happened because the CDC is required to produce authoritative knowledge during a crisis. This calls for a different response structure than might work for direct, frontline operations.

You can order free copies of this report and/or download this report.

 

From Forest Fires to Hurricane Katrina: Case Studies of Incident Command Systems

From Forest Fires to Hurricane Katrina: Case Studies of Incident Command Systems

Author: Donald Moynihan

The success of the ICS as a hierarchical-network organizational model in emergencies such as forest fires led to its being designated by the federal government as the preferred approach for responding to emergencies. However, it seemingly failed in the response to Hurricane Katrina. Professor Moynihan examines the Katrina case, as well as others, and identifies the conditions under which the ICS approach can be successful. (2007)

Download this report.

 

Leveraging Collaborative Networks in Infrequent Emergency Situations

Leveraging Collaborative Networks in Infrequent Emergency Situations

Author: Donald Moynihan

This research reviews a highly successful model of network collaboration that contained the outbreak of Exotic Newcastle disease, (a highly contagious disease among poultry), in California in 2002. The success of the effort was in part the result of the incident management system approach taken, a model of collaboration broadly applicable to all infrequent emergency situations.  (2005)

You can order free copies of this report and/or download this report.

 

 

The Business of Government Blogs

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One Size Doesn't Fit All: Marshaling Science in Crises by John Kamensky
A long view on innovating for acquisition reform – Set a Vision and Start Down a Path by Dan Chenok

 

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05/12/2014

Nick Nayak
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05/19/2014

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FEMA

 

 

 

05/26/2014

Curtis CoyCurtis Coy

Deputy Under Secretary for Economic Opportunity
Department of Veterans Affairs