Senior Fellow, Beeck Center for Social Impact and Innovation
Georgetown University
United States

Frank DiGiammarino served first as the White House Deputy and then as the Director of the Recovery Implementation Office, where he was responsible for coordinating a complex and diverse network of federal, state and local governments in disbursing $787 billion after the Great Recession. Since leaving the White House, Frank became an early member of the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Worldwide Public Sector Leadership Team, and in 2012 built and implemented the strategy to open AWS business units in the Asia Pacific, Canada, Europe and Latin America. After successfully leading global expansion, Frank then led U.S. State and Local Government for AWS. Currently, he is a Senior Fellow at the Beeck Center for Social Impact and Innovation at Georgetown University. Frank has a unique perspective that comes from a career working at leading systems integrators, management consulting firms, the White House, Amazon, think tanks, and as a co-founder and advisor of a private venture capital company.  Frank has written other popular publications, like “Can Government Work like OpenTable?” and Happiness is a Balance: A Personal Framework, which can be found on www.frankdigiammarino.com.  He lives in Bethesda, MD with his wife, three children, and dogs.

Guest Blogger: Frank DiGiammarino

Frank DiGiammarino served first as the White House Deputy and then as the Director of the Recovery Implementation Office, where he was responsible for coordinating a complex and diverse network of federal, state and local governments in disbursing $787 billion after the Great Recession. Since leaving the White House, Frank became an early member of the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Worldwide Public Sector Leadership Team, and in 2012 built and implemented the strategy to open AWS business units in the Asia Pacific, Canada, Europe and Latin America.

Doing Big Things Well in Government: A Lesson from The Past

What would it take for government to regain the public’s trust in its ability to get the job done well and solve problems? A strong program would need to: